Newspaper Archive of
Hells Canyon Journal
Halfway, Oregon
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March 31, 1993     Hells Canyon Journal
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March 31, 1993
 

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Page 16 Hells Canyon Journal March 31, 1993 By Gus Garrigus Sponsored by: Outfitters m~ml,~.mmmmoB "Outfitting Hells Canyon Float Trips Since 1980" 1503) 742-7238 Local Fishing:. Some good catches of crappie and large trout are being reported from Brownlee Reservoir. This body of water is now about four feet below full, having risen about twenty-three feet in two weeks. The water is 42 degrees cool. All ice is gone. Oxbow and Hells Canyon reservoirs continue to produce practically no fmh. A few, very few, trout are taken daily near the end of the Oxbow, and some are taken at the Oxbow Intakes, and all spots are fairly busy with no-catch fishermen. The Snake River below Hells Canyon Dam is flowing at pretty high run-off-- 45,000 to 55,000 cubic feet per second --- and the water is still 38 degrees cold. At these flows, fishing is almost non-existent. This mighty high water will speed the 400,000 chinook smolts that have been planted below Hells Canyon Dam to- ward the ocean. The water should stay high enough to flush the additional plantings downstream. High water day on the Snake River has his- torically been May 15. If the warm weather and rains con- tinue, peak flows will be sub- stantially before that date. Anyway, unless you care for some few crappie or nice trout from Brownlee, you might want to let the local fishing ..- , , rest. Southeast: Absolutely, don't try to fish here, either. Northeast: All area r ser- voirs are filling rapidly and all area streams are out of fishing condition. Unity, Wolf Creek and Phillips reservoirs are good for trout, as usual. Statewide: Recent checks on angling success on the west- ern rivers revealed the follow- ing: 35 boats plying the Gorge area of the Columbia River had kept 60 legal sturgeon, released 71 legal and 346 sub- legal fish. Twenty-seven bank rods in the same area had 2 legals kept and 3 legals re- leased. At the mouth of the Willamette River 11 legals kept, nine legals and 144 sub- legals released for 21 boats, and no catch for two salmon boats. Between St. Helens and Goble on the Columbia River 50 boats had bagged no salmon, and another fifty boats had managed 18 legal sturgeon kept and 2,654 sub- legals released. The smelt runs really perk up the stur- geon. The lower Umpqua River is pretty good for striped bass and sturgeon. The only good steelhead report is on the upper North Umpqua River. Of Interest: We have been a frequent and very vocal critic of the FFF (Famous Fish Flush) mostly because it seems to coincide with the spawning activity of the crappie and other warm-water fish in Brownlee Reservoir, but, also, because we do not feel that the flushes are timed to assist the salmon and steelhead smolts downstream to the ocean. Now comes Keith Higginson, Idaho State Water Resources Director, who ac- cuses Bonneville Power Ad- ministration of storing the FFF water at Little Goose and Lower Granite dams and then using that water for power gefierati'on. BPA admitted the use, violating their agreement, but said the reason was the drought. Higginson said BPA had every intent of using wa- ter from Idaho (that's draw- down of Brownlee Reservoir, mostly) in a similar manner in the future. Higginson further criticizedBPA for bargingfish downstream from the two dams when recent studies proved such barging was det- rimental to the survWal ofsev- eral endangered species. BPA disagreed with this assess- ment, saying other studies contradicted these findings. A 1992 Idaho state law permits stopping further water re- leases in 1993. We sincerely urge a stop to the flush. After noting our causes for not reporting anything about NEW BRIDGE ACREAGE Long growing season in New Bridge on this five acres is perfect location for orchard, truck garden or residenc Has water ...................................... $49,500 VIEW OF WALLOWA MOUNTAINS Large rooms with leaded windows and attractive roof lines make this 2 story, 5 bedroom home cheery and livable. Covered carport and shop for tools and toys with 2 1/4 acres of prime ground providing garden space and paddocks. Located ,east of Halfway ................................................................................................. $85,000 5 can8o DESIGNATED BROKER - Mary Ann Hamley SALES ASSOCIATES - Cynthia Valcarcel 742-5881 (Home) Venna Moody 742-2040 (Home) Patricia Gainsforth investments, inc. 4fwa j, 742-2233 commercial fishing, we now note that ocean fishing for salmon is endangered by the lack of fish. The recreational fishery :is expected to drop in dollar value by about 50% in 1993, compared to 1992, which was the poorest on record. The commercial sport fishing in- dustry produced some $9.5 million in personal income last year and is expected to drop to $4.7 million this year. Fur- ther, bays and estuaries will be considered part of the ocean for catch purposes. Seemingly, the mouth of the Columbia River will have a somewhat more liberal sport-fishing sea- son th n 1992. We suppose the reason for this is to catch more salmon stocks from the Snake River, which are en- dangered species. An extraor- dinarily questionable esti- mate by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers states that the drawdown of LittleGoose and Lower Granite dams could cost from $1 to $5 billion in five years. The Corps also fmds no good biological reason to con- tinue the drawdowns. Oregon State University professor William J. McNeil finds that increased water flows do not have anything to do with smolt survival. He says that too little is known about the life cycle of the salmon to be sure how they react to dif- ferent flows. Well the fish did just fine when there were no dams, and they could get from Lewiston, Idaho, to the sea in 12 to 15 days. Now that it takes them 35 to 45 days, they do not do well. The de- cline from 16 million to 2.5 million upstream migrant adults should be a body of in- formation and adequate evi- dence to anyone not employed by the Corps. The Pacific Northwest Gen- erating Cooperative also op- poses drawdowns. Anyone wishing to join Fish In Northwest Streams (FIN S) should contact Steve Culley in Baker City. Steve advises membership is $20 per year. He can be reached at 1992 Plum Street, Baker City. Prices Effective: March 31 - April 3 Toasted Oats W.F. .......................... 1 s oz. $1.49 Chunk Tuna Chix.of the Sea ...... 6.12 oz. 65(~ Crm. of Chicken Campbell's .... 10.75 oz. 75 Rice Minute ...................................... 28 oz. $2.59 Chocolate Syrup Hershey's ......... 124 oz. $1.69 Pinto Beans W.F ........................... 15 oz. 2/89 Tapioca Minute ................................. 8 oz. $2.19 Buttermilk Bread Eddy's ................. 24 oz. 99 Red Grapefruit Juice o.s ......... 64 oz. $2.69 Dish Detergent W.F. auto ............. 65 oz. $2.19 Tub & Tile Cleaner Lyso ................. 17 oz. $2.09 Facial Tissue W.F ............................ 95 ct.. 75 FI EEZEI LaCreme .......................................... 8 oz. $1.09 Imitation Crab Meat Sea Blends 16 oz. 51.99 #1 Potatoes lO Ibs ...................................... 99 Red Delicious Apples ..................... 59 lb. Radishes & Green Onions ............. 4/51.00 Reg. Pork Spare Ribs ................... $1.39 lb. Fresh Pork Roast ................................ 99 lb. Sliced Slab Bacon Tri Miller ........... $1.19 lb.